7 Reasons Many Alumni Don’t Donate to Their College

Graduating from college is one of life's major accomplishments. It should be celebrated ecstatically with all of an alumni's family and friends. As several months roll by, graduates contemplate their career, or perhaps just a get a job to earn money before starting a career. But, at the same time, most graduates get the "call." It's not from an employer interested in hiring, but a representative from your school's alumni office asking for a donation!

A donation already? Surprise!

Universities and colleges really want to build on their already long donor list. They don't care about that huge amount of tuition money that a new alumni may be still paying off for the next 20 years. When colleges do call, they try to get the most from you: "Would $50 be enough? What about $100 to be on our "Silver Standard Group? Or, $500 to be on our Gold Standard Group?"

Today alumni are giving less to their school than they were twenty years ago, primarily for seven reasons.

1. According to the August 31, 2016 post of the Washington Examiner, the main reason most alumni aren't giving money to their college is because they would use the money to give to worthier charitable causes. Besides, most alumni believe their college doesn't need the money as much.

2. Colleges and universities charge a lot of money. For a four-year education the bill can go up as much as $280,000. Many college students are in serious debt because of such steep tuition costs. Still, colleges have the nerve to ask for money to many who graduated recently.

3. Young graduates probably neither have a job nor have decided on a career. Specific jobs can be difficult to find. Careers take time to plan and implement. Many feel they should save the money they have already.

4. Colleges ask for donations to increase the reputation of the school. According to the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver, donating to university helps the reputation of the school. However, many schools base their reputation, less on academics and more on sports, especially in football and basketball. Tickets for both sports sell for quite a lot of money. There is such a loyal fan base that I wonder if the fans even know their big winning schools are schools at all. Overall, at the larger schools, alumni believe the school will still be standing in the next decade or so because it exists to win a national championship.

5. Many alumni won't "give back" due to less than satisfactory academic and student life experiences. They feel no loyalty to the school because it is based on connectedness between the student and the school. These alumni typically don't especially care how well it does financially now or in the future.

6. Universities and colleges aren't the learning centers they used to be. According to the National Review website, they have become places where professors are teaching indoctrination of liberal ideas rather than on fewer facts. Many schools have become institutions of unrest due to racial chaos. Plus, more political correctness is demanded at many schools. College education is a completely different animal today than before.

7. Public and many private universities are already heavily funded by government dollars. Tuition and donations fund large private colleges. However, smaller colleges can manage alone with the enormous tuition costs for each student, even though they have fewer costs. As a result, many greedy private colleges and universities own such heavy endowments in the millions and billions of dollars that will never completely be used up.

Do you donate to your school? These seven reasons might make you change your mind about giving to your school. Colleges and universities can come off as greedy and insensitive to unfulfilled financial needs, especially if they call for money one or two months after graduation. Today, fewer alumni are committed to giving to their school due to a large shortage of money because of high tuition costs. The school really doesn't need a donation because it already has a superior reputation. Some alumni have little or no school loyalty because their overall experience of their education and student life was negative. Education has been so watered down by political correctness, personal opinions and fewer facts. If these trends continue, alumni will continue giving much less money to their schools.



Source by Harrington A Lackey

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